counter-culture

what is counter-culture? counter-culture is a think tank and aggregate effort to promote dissenting and/or deviating thought. it is a medium to examine varying perspectives and issues within culture, art, aesthetics, history, philosophy, politics, economics, psychology, and environment. this is an interminable struggle against the forces of ignorance, disillusionment, exploitation, misrepresentation, and propaganda. take whatever parcels knowledge, wisdom, and compassion you can derive, and go forth sharing it with all others; to oblivion, and beyond.

-born in the Bay Area, California,
-living in Edinburgh, Scotland.

"it is easier and less costly to change the way people think about reality than it is to change reality" -Morris Wolfe

"The only way to deal with an unfree world is to become so absolutely free that your very existence is an act of rebellion" -Albert Camus

Regards,
-Christopher


Filed in: subway food eating agriculture environment health usa sandwiches processed food information cancer disease fda food industry

The Subway deception | Hang The Bankers

Did you ever hear of a chemical ingredient called azodicarbonamide? Me either. It’s banned as a food additive in the U.K., Europe, and Australia. But not at Subway. Interestingly enough, if you get caught using it in Singapore you get up to 15 years in prison and a fine of $450,000.

And why? Because it’s primary use is in the production of foamed plastics. But in the good ole U S of A, it can be used as a food additive, a flour-bleaching agent, and a dough conditioner because it improves the elasticity of bread.”


Filed in: cnn travel tourism globalism neocolonialism neoimperialism environment thailand bolivia adventure destinations news gringo trails documentary pegi vail anthropology knowledge awareness

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Gringo Trails: Is tourism destroying the world?

"CNN: Is there a right or wrong way to travel?

PV: Look, if you’re just going to Koh Pha Ngan for the full moon party, to cross it off your bucket list, then that’s the wrong reason to travel.

You could have a party at home — you’re just using the place as a backdrop.

And, yes, you might be bringing money into a town when you travel there but the relationship with local people has to be managed — they need to be at the planning table.

CNN: What are some tips on traveling responsibly?

Pegi Vail: First, no matter what your budget, it costs nothing to research your destination, to find out more about the environment and the culture.

I would read local writers who’ve written about their own culture — or at the very least your guidebook’s history section.

Learn about the dos and don’ts.

If someone says, “Don’t go naked on the beach,” then don’t go naked on the beach!”


Merry Christmas everyone. While we’re on the topic of Xmas and the North Pole, I strongly recommend you to watch this documentary above any if you can, it’s the best one i’ve seen all year and it’s something that affects us all. Do it for Santa. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eIZTMVNBjc4

Filed in: christmas ice snow winter glaciers science climate climate change climatology global warming environment rising oceans weather national geographic extreme ice survey chasing ice documentary documentary film movies trailer photography cinematography greenland iceland alaska north pole melting ice greenhouse gases james balog nasa


"We waste 1.3 billion tons of food each year. The details are startling, but the solutions are simple."

Filed in: food food waste agriculture ecosystem environment hunger food solutions sustainability sustainable practices green hunger games consumption food industry

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"We waste 1.3 billion tons of food each year. The details are startling, but the solutions are simple."

Climate change the state of the science (data visualization)

Filed in: climate change global warming earth planet environment ecosystem weather science atmosphere carbon emissions sustainable development green thinking interconnectivity infoanimation politics world issues overpopulation

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FUKUSHIMA: BEYOND URGENT

Filed in: FUKUSHIMA nuclear energy japan tsunami natural disaster radiation nuclear proliferation nuclear reactors nuclear fallout energy sustainability environment technology disaster

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Filed in: sustainability mark boyle the moneyless man ecofriendly environment climate change global warming economics sustainable development happiness inspiration capitalism green progressive solutions globalism education interdependence consumerism reduce waste consumption practices money currency forward thinking freeconomy justfortheloveit.org freeskilling community

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The man who lives without money

"Irishman Mark Boyle tried to live life with no income, no bank balance and no spending. Here’s how he finds it.

If someone told me seven years ago, in my final year of a business and economics degree, that I’d now be living without money, I’d have probably choked on my microwaved ready meal. The plan back then was to get a ‘good’ job, make as much money as possible, and buy the stuff that would show society I was successful.

For a while I did it – I had a fantastic job managing a big organic food company; had myself a yacht on the harbour. If it hadn’t been for the chance purchase of a video called Gandhi, I’d still be doing it today. Instead, for the last fifteen months, I haven’t spent or received a single penny. Zilch.

The change in life path came one evening on the yacht whilst philosophising with a friend over a glass of merlot. Whilst I had been significantly influenced by the Mahatma’s quote “be the change you want to see in the world”, I had no idea what that change was up until then. We began talking about all major issues in the world – environmental destruction, resource wars, factory farms, sweatshop labour – and wondering which of these we would be best devoting our time to. Not that we felt we could make any difference, being two small drops in a highly polluted ocean.

But that evening I had a realisation. These issues weren’t as unrelated as I had previously thought – they had a common root cause. I believe the fact that we no longer see the direct repercussions our purchases have on the people, environment and animals they affect is the factor that unites these problems.

The degrees of separation between the consumer and the consumed have increased so much that it now means we’re completely unaware of the levels of destruction and suffering embodied in the ‘stuff’ we buy.

Very few people actually want to cause suffering to others; most just don’t have any idea that they directly are. The tool that has enabled this separation is money, especially in its globalised format.

Take this for an example: if we grew our own food, we wouldn’t waste a third of it as we do today.

If we made our own tables and chairs, we wouldn’t throw them out the moment we changed the interior décor.

If we had to clean our own drinking water, we probably wouldn’t shit in it.

So to be the change I wanted to see in the world, it unfortunately meant I was going to have to give up money, which I decided to do for a year initially. So I made a list of the basics I’d need to survive. I adore food, so it was at the top. There are four legs to the food-for-free table: foraging wild food, growing your own, bartering and using waste grub, of which there far too much.

On my first day I fed 150 people a three course meal with waste and foraged food. Most of the year I ate my own crops though and waste only made up about five per cent my diet. I cooked outside – rain or shine – on a rocket stove.

Next up was shelter. So I got myself a caravan from Freecycle, parked it on an organic farm I was volunteering with, and kitted it out to be off the electricity grid. I’d use wood I either coppiced or scavenged to heat my humble abode in a wood burner made from an old gas bottle, and I had a compost loo to make ‘humanure’ for my veggies.

I bathed in a river, and for toothpaste I used washed up cuttlefish bone with wild fennel seeds, an oddity for a vegan. For loo roll I’d relieve the local newsagents of its papers (I once wiped my arse with a story about myself); it wasn’t double quilted but it quickly became normal. To get around I had a bike and trailer, and the 55 km commute to the city doubled up as my gym subscription. For lighting I’d use beeswax candles.

Many people label me an anti-capitalist. Whilst I do believe capitalism is fundamentally flawed, requiring infinite growth on a finite planet, I am not anti anything. I am pro-nature, pro-community and pro-happiness. And that’s the thing I don’t get – if all this consumerism and environmental destruction brought happiness, it would make some sense. But all the key indicators of unhappiness – depression, crime, mental illness, obesity, suicide and so on are on the increase. More money it seems, does not equate to more happiness.

Ironically, I have found this year to be the happiest of my life. I’ve more friends in my community than ever, I haven’t been ill since I began, and I’ve never been fitter. I’ve found that friendship, not money, is real security. That most western poverty is spiritual. And that independence is really interdependence.

Could we all live like this tomorrow? No. It would be a catastrophe, we are too addicted to both it and cheap energy, and have managed to build an entire global infrastructure around the abundance of both. But if we devolved decision making and re-localised down to communities of no larger than 150 people, then why not? For over 90 per cent of our time on this planet, a period when we lived much more ecologically, we lived without money. Now we are the only species to use it, probably because we are the species most out of touch with nature.

People now often ask me what is missing compared to my old world of lucre and business. Stress. Traffic-jams. Bank statements. Utility bills. Oh yeah, and the odd pint of organic ale with my mates down the local.”


The Story of Solutions

-The Story of Stuff Project

Filed in: story of stuff infoanimation progressive environment politics economy economis gdp consumerism capitalism sustainability green sustainable development environmental solution ecology green energy systems theory recycling solutions materialism waste management education

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The Scarecrow

Fiona Apple may sing hauntingly about being a hot knife cutting butter on the closing track of her latest record, The Idler Wheel, but dairy remains solely in the realm of metaphor for the vegan singer.

Yesterday saw Apple taking her food politics to the web in the form of a new video she made with Chipotle. In it, she gives a plaintive air to the lyrics of “Pure Imagination,” which Gene Wilder originally sang in Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory. The tone shifts, thanks to Apple’s musical interpretation, but the sad magic of the video comes from the contrast with the visuals: a silent narrative of an animated scarecrow farmer discovering what lays behind the supermarket pastoral branding of a big food company. There’s an industrial factory hiding beyond a welcoming red barn door. Inside, the scarecrow sees artificially fattened chickens, caged livestock, and drone-like crows working over parched fields; “100% Beef-ish” is the label stamped on packages that come off the factory’s conveyor belt.  

Filed in: agriculture education video games fiona apple factory farming meat industry food food culture usa america sustainability graphic animation art environment sustainable practices chipotle

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Treez

Filed in: trees nature climate environment ecology

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Treez

Filed in: consumed slackjaw film journeyman pictures consumerism capitalism globalism politics economy foodforthought environment

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Ron Finley: A guerilla gardener in South Central LA

Ron Finley plants vegetable gardens in South Central LA — in abandoned lots, traffic medians, along the curbs. Why? For fun, for defiance, for beauty and to offer some alternative to fast food in a community where “the drive-thrus are killing more people than the drive-bys.”

Ron Finley grows a nourishing food culture in South Central L.A.’s food desert by planting the seeds and tools for healthy eating. 

Filed in: ron finley tedxtalks TED south central LA gardening sustainability los angeles urban gardening ecolutionary green living progressive environment food practices health wellbeing democracy

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TEDxNewy 2011 - Tim Silverwood - How did our lives become so plastic?

Filed in: TED environment ted talks newy tim silverwood plastic consumerism capitalism waste management ecosystem sustainability green living politics great pacific gyre garbage progressive

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Filed in: monsanto lasso agriculture health french justice french politics us justice us politics american politics chemistry science social issues pesticides farming sustainable practices GMO ecology environment green living

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Monsanto Found Guilty of Chemical Poisoning in Landmark Case

A French farmer who can no longer perform his routine farming duties because of permanent pesticide injuries has had his day in court, literally, and the perpetrator of his injuries found guilty of chemical poisoning. The French court in Lyon ruled that Monsanto’s Lasso weedkiller formula, which contains the active ingredient alachlor, caused Paul Francois to develop lifelong neurological damage that manifests as persistent memory loss, headaches, and stuttering during speech.

Reports indicate that the 47-year-old farmer sued Monsanto back in 2004 after inhaling the Lasso product while cleaning his sprayer tank equipment. Not long after, Francois began experiencing lasting symptoms that prevented him from working, which he says were directly linked to exposure to the chemical. Since Lasso’s packaging did not bear adequate warnings about the dangers of exposure, Francois alleged at the time that Monsanto was essentially negligent in providing adequate protection for its customers.

To the surprise of many, the French court agreed with the claims and evidence presented before it, declaring earlier this year that “Monsanto is responsible for Paul Francois’ suffering after he inhaled the Lasso product … and must entirely compensate him.” The court is said to be seeking expert opinion on how to gauge Francois’ losses in order to determine precisely how much Monsanto will be required to compensate him in the case.

“It is a historic decision in so far as it is the first time that a (pesticide) maker is found guilty of such a poisoning,” said Francois Lafforgue, Paul Francois’ lawyer, to Reuters earlier in the year.

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), exposure to alachlor can cause damage to the liver, kidneys, spleen, and eyes, and may lead to the development of anemia and even cancer. The EPA apparently views alachlor as so dangerous, in fact, that the agency has set the maximum contaminant level goals (MCLG) for alachlor to zero in order to “prevent potential health problems.” (http://water.epa.gov/drink/contaminants/basicinformation/alachlor.cfm)

In 2007, France officially banned Lasso from use in the country in accordance with a European Union (EU) directive enacted in 2006 prohibiting the chemical from further use on crops in any member countries. But despite all the evidence proving that alachlor can disrupt hormonal balance, induce reproductive or developmental problems, and cause cancer, the chemical is still being used on conventional crops throughout the U.S. to this very day. (http://www.pesticideinfo.org/Detail_ChemReg.jsp?Rec_Id=PC35160)

“I am alive today, but part of the farming population is going to be sacrificed and is going to die because of (alachlor),” added Francois to Reuters.


Read more at http://www.realfarmacy.com/monsanto-found-guilty-of-chemical-poisoning-in-landmark-case1/#LUJXxsMmw3evohG8.99 


Filed in: environment ecology google climate change climate shift geology natural sciences education urban growth google maps satellite maps geography NASA Earth Egnine

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source: edwardspoonhands

dream-caught:

edwardspoonhands:

Google Earth Engine is a joint project between Google and NASA that allows anyone access to a 30 year time-lapse of the surface of the earth. I made a video about how amazing, terrifying, and important it is.

Wow.

DAMN.

(via dream-caught-deactivated2014032)